The 1901 Motor Carriage of Queen Alexandra,
wife of King Edward VII of England.
This automobile was supplied by
City and Suburban Electric Carriage Company, Ltd.,
the firm which manufactured automobiles in London
under license from Electric Vehicle Company of Hartford,
the creator and producer of the Columbia cars.




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More about the history and development
of City and Suburban vehicles



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1901 Automobile Club Show

ELECTRICITY AT THE AUTOMOBILE CLUB EXHIBITION.

A very important departure on the commercial side, confined to electrical cars, is that of the City and Suburban Electric Car Co, of Denman Street, Piccadilly, who are laying themselves out to maintain the cars in a thoroughly convenient manner to the owners, where the cars are purchased from them. They propose to house, clean, insure, and look after the cars generally, so that they can be taken out at any time of the day or night, and to provide an unlimited supply of charging current for a fixed annual or quarterly rental.

The cars will be run round to the house of the owner immediately on receipt of a telephone message, and will be run back to the station when the owner alights, fresh accumulators put in, or fresh charge, as may be necessary. In the case of the theatre, the cars will not wait outside the theatre; the station will have notice when the piece is nearly over, and the car will be run round, or it can be had by telephone at any time. The charge is uniform for all sizes of vehicles and for all classes of users. The company propose to open depots wherever trade allows.


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Electromobiles

City and Suburban Electric Carriage Co. of 6, Denman Street, Piccadilly Circus, London

A very large variety of electric carriages of most luxurious types, two at least of which will be entirely new. Some have a capacity of fifty miles on one charge.


Stand No. 164 (Concert Room). The  CITY & SUBURBAN ELECTRIC CARRIAGE CO. Niagara, York Street, Westminster, S.W.

    * Grand Victoria. Runs 40 miles on one charge. Price, 760 guineas.
    * Victoria. Runs 40 miles on one charge. Price, 540 guineas.
    * Omnibus. 30 miles on one charge. Price, 865 guineas.
    * Double-Battery Landaulette. 80 miles on one charge. Price, 680 guineas.
    * Landaulette. 40 miles on one charge. Price, 585 guineas.
    * Landaulette. 40 miles on one charge. Price, 570 guineas.
    * Special Landaulette. 40 miles on one charge.
    * Single Brougham. 40 miles on one charge. Price, 555 guineas.
    * Surrey Phaeton. Price, 505 guineas. Can also be had with two batteries and pneumatic tyres, to run 80 to 90 miles on one charge at speeds up to 25 per hour.
    * Runabout. 40 to 45 miles on one charge. Price, 357 guineas with pneumatics, or 334 guineas with solids.
    * Tonneau. 40 miles on one charge. Prices, 515 or 540 guineas.
    * The whole of the above are electric carriages.
    * Combination Petrol-Electric Vehicle, possessing all the advantages of the electric and petrol systems, without any of the noise inseparable from the latter. No racing of engine, no change speed gear, no chains. Prices and full particulars on application.


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As seen in the catalogue page above, the second name
on this list is The Dowager Empress of Russia.
To view photographs of what remains of her car,
as well as more photos of Queen Alexandra's car,
which is now in the Beaulieu Museum, click here.


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Next, a comprehensive article (with illustrations)
about the City and Suburban Carriages

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Next, from another publication, an article detailing
City and Suburban cabs, etc.

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What follows is another section from the same book about cabs
made by Morris and Salom, creators of the Electrobat,
whose endeavor was purchased by Isaac L. Rice
and re-named the Electric Vehicle Company
(which was presented on a previous webpage)

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Date: April 1906

Description: In a letter dated April 1906 Mr. W. B. Peat wrote to the Duke of Sutherland to inform him that ‘The City and Suburban Electric Carriage’ company’s “Niagara” garage was being sold to the ‘Wolseley Tool & Motor Car Co.’.

The letter notifies the Duke, who was a customer of the garage, that the original maintenance contracts held by the Electric Carriage Company would be taken over by the new company and that the accounts would be changed accordingly. The letter also notes that the ‘supply of such parts and such repairs to carriages’ would continue as normal.

On the back page of the letter is further detail regarding the takeover by the Wolseley Tool & Motor Company which involved a number of garages located in Piccadilly and elsewhere in London. The aim of the takeover was to ‘concentrate and develop the whole lot’ at the company's newly refurbished York Street depot. The letter remarks that this was soon to be ‘the finest and most convenient garage in London’. The further information supplied by the Wolseley Tool & Motor Car Company also assures the Duke of Sutherland that the majority of the staff from the “Niagara” garage would be retained and that this, coupled with the new facilities, should warrant both the Duke’s recommendation and a ‘considerable increase in business’.





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The next (very lengthy) item does not directly involve
the City and Suburban Electric Carriage Company,
but was filed by another vehicle manufacturer,
asking for a judgment regarding their name.
The ruling cites "City and Suburban" as an
example in support of the decision.



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